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Dance stretches for flexibility: best 9 poses for beginners

Dance requires a lot of flexibility. Depending on the dancer's age, developing dance flexibility might take up to six months or a full year of consistent practice. Dancers who want to see results straight away may find it upsetting.

While you don't want to overstretch, if you don't stretch enough, you won't get any benefits. You should pay attention to your tight spots, but you shouldn't ignore other regions, or your equilibrium will go off.

Here are some stretches and exercises for young dancers to increase their flexibility for dancing.

Spinal stretching

Your hips will open up, and your mid-back mobility will increase thanks to this stretch, which is important for ballet spins.

Step forward forcefully with your left foot as you begin with your feet together. Your feet should now be spread apart. As if lunging, flex your left knee. Maintain a straight right leg behind you.

Spinal stretching

Tricep stretching

The arms are a place that needs substantial stretching, which dancers frequently ignore. Although most dancers concentrate on their legs, you will also need flexible arms to execute numerous ballet postures.

Stand tall with your feet hip-width apart to stretch your triceps. Your arms should be raised over your head. To touch the top center of your back, bend your right elbow and extend your hand behind your head.

To attain a deeper stretch, you can carefully move your elbow toward your head. Your neck, shoulders, back, and triceps should all feel stretched. Repeat on the opposite side when you have finished holding the stretch.

Tricep stretching

Hamstring stretching

The neck, back, glutes, hamstrings, and calf muscles all greatly benefit from this stretch. Start by taking a tall stance and placing your feet hip-width apart. Your arms should be by your side while your legs are slightly bent.

Breathe out as you slant your hips downward and lower your head to the ground. As you perform this stretch, try to keep your neck, shoulders, and head relaxed.

Hamstring stretching

Hold while you round your legs with your arms. According to experts, you should hold a stretch for 15 to 60 minutes. You should spend extra time stretching this area as part of your dancer training plan if you enter a stretch and feel like you want to release right away.

Bend at the knees and roll yourself back up to a standing posture after you have finished holding your stretch.

Butterfly stretching

This easy stretch benefits the back, thighs, glutes, and hips. Sit on the ground with your soles touching and your back straight. Knees extended to the side.

Hold your ankles or feet, contracting your core, lowering your upper body as low as you can while simultaneously forcing your knees into the floor.

Butterfly stretching

Piriformis stretching

Outside of the butt, there is a muscle called the piriformis, an internal hip rotator that is deep. Stretching your deep internal rotators, which are responsible for most of the movement in your hips, should be a regular element of your ballet routine.

Legs stretch in front of you while you sit on the floor. Your left foot should be level on the ground alongside you as you cross your left leg over your right. Afterward, put your left hand on the ground behind your body.

Alternatively, raise your elbow to your knee and push your left leg to the right while placing your right hand on your quad. When you are doing the stretch properly, your body should feel twisted.

Piriformis stretching

The ground should be beneath your toes. Your right thigh will feel stretched. Now put your right hand on the floor next to you and lean to the left with your upper body. Stretch as though you're attempting to touch the ceiling by raising your left arm toward the ceiling.

Repeat on the opposite side while holding the stretch.

Hips stretching

Due to the simultaneous pressure on both hips, this stretch is another excellent one for dancers. Sit with your right knee extended in front of you at a 90-degree angle. Your sole should be pointing left, and your foot should remain flexed.

Put your left knee to the left of your torso and let your leg rest flat on the ground. The knees should be bent so that the foot is facing backwards. Keep this foot flexed as well.

Move the left glute as near to the floor as you can while doing your best to maintain your right glute on the floor. If your glutes or hips are really tight from dancing a lot, this might not be doable.

Repeat on the opposite side while holding the stretch.

Hips stretching

Shoulders stretching

This stretch relaxes the back and corrects bad posture. Kneel down on the floor with your feet flat. Straighten and extend your arms while clasping your hands behind your lower back.

For a brief period of time, squeeze your shoulder blades together before releasing them. 5 to 10 times should be added to this stretch.

Shoulders stretching

Neck stretching

The majority of dancers neglect to lengthen their necks. A decent neck stretch may have a wonderful effect on your entire body.

Reach your right shoulder with your right ear. To deepen the stretch and hold it, press down on your head. Complete the stretch on the opposite side once you are finished.

Neck stretching

Side bend stretching

This simple stretch keeps the inner thighs and hips flexible. Bow down on the ground and join your legs. Maintain a straight back and a tight core. Put your left leg out in front of you.

Then lean your left arm against your left knee while raising your right arm. Gently lean your body to the left by bending your right arm and torso. As you hold the stretch, make an effort to keep your hips pointing forward. Then go to the opposite side.

Side bend stretching

Dance stretches - Conclusion

Nobody ever developed flexibility over night. Stretching should be a regular component of your practice if you want to increase your flexibility as a dancer. If you persist, you'll start to see a change.

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Written by CalypsoRoom Editorial Team
The CalypsoRoom Editorial Team is a skilled and diverse group of writers, researchers, and industry specialists who have access to Calypso's data and information in order to give you broad knowledge about the music industry as well as helpful advice to help you manage your music and dancing career.

Updated January 2023






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